Elizabeth Davie – Super Woman Money Program

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In two minds? Definitely go!

Elizabeth Davie takes risk with this show. Much of the subject matter shouldn’t be funny, but somehow, in her hands…

Student debt and the property ladder were jokes on her and most of the audience. Her efforts to impress a rental agent were side-achingly funny. Her somewhat…intimate response to the subject of superannuation was just perfect.

The show is risky also because of its disregard for the comedy canon. If Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette carved a new path, Elizabeth Davie – Super Woman Money Program widens it to cover new and important ground.

Like Hannah Gadsby, Elizabeth Davie shows comedic brilliance, and she has the intellect and heart to step out from behind it. She is willing to break the contract: that moments of tension and discomfort must have an antidote.

And she adds a clause: comedy does not weaken the warrior, it fuels the fight.

But Elizabeth Davie is no imitator. She is her own performer with her own agenda. Deranged, manic, engaging, sobering, thought-provoking, inspiring.

Her show is a call to action on the ordinary things that combine to make women over 55 the fastest growing cohort of homeless people in Australia.

Elizabeth Davie – Super Woman Money Program is not adversarial, it is not preachy.

The star of the show has a wonderful talent for building connection with an audience, so its members can connect with her message.

We were left with an alternate vision, and sense of hope and duty, and the chance to take a first step right then and there.

Love the show? Have your say!

Paul-McLeod

Review by Paul McLeod on 20 Jan 2019

Paul McLeod studied literature and drama, and was a musician and actor, before he got sucked into a vortex of corporate communications and risk management that lasted 25 years. He has co-organised a couple of small music festivals, and recently won an award for world's worst band manager. Look out Fringe World, here he comes (creeping)!